Manon de Boer in panel conversation at the Philadelphia Museum of Art – Philadelphia, PA

February 3rd, 2013 by

Manon de Boer, Think about Wood, Think about Metal (still), 2011, courtesy of the artist and Jan Mot Brussels-Mexico City

Friday, February 8, 2013

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is pleased to present the conversation “In Context: Resonating Surfaces –A Trilogy”. Enjoy a conversation between Manon de Boer, avant-garde percussionist Robyn Schulkowsky, and Adelina Vlas, the Museum’s Assistant Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, as they discuss the exhibition “Live Cinema/Manon de Boer: Resonating Surfaces–A Trilogy”.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130
Tel.: 215-763-8100

Bookmark and Share

Manon de Boer and Mark Manders in survey exhibition “Silence” at Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive – Berkeley, CA

January 31st, 2013 by

Mark Manders: Reduced Summer Garden Night Scene (Reduced to 88%), 2011; sand, painted porcelain, iron, wood, and rope; 33 1/2 × 59 3/8 × 39 3/4 in.; courtesy of Zeno x gallery, Antwerp, and Tanya Bonakdar gallery, New York. © Mark Manders. Photo: Peter Cox.

January 30 – April 28, 2013

The Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive is pleased to present “Silence”, a survey exhibition that presents nearly a century of modern and contemporary art and film to examine the spiritual, existential, and political aspects of silence. It includes work by among others Manon de Boer and Mark Manders. In today’s digitized world, silence is increasingly elusive. For composer John Cage, the absence of sound was not merely elusive, it was impossible. His groundbreaking composition 4’33” contained no actual music, but instead called attention to the ambient sounds surrounding the performance and its audience. He asserted “there is always something to see, something to hear.” On the occasion of Cage’s hundredth birthday, Silence presents nearly a century of modern and contemporary art and film to examine the spiritual, existential, and political aspects of silence.

» Read more «

Bookmark and Share

Manon de Boer: Resonating Surfaces – A Trilogy at the Philadelphia Museum of Art – Philadelphia

November 11th, 2012 by

Manon de Boer, Think about Wood, Think about Metal (still), 2011, courtesy of the artist and Jan Mot Brussels-Mexico City

November 17, 2012 – February 10, 2013

The Philadelphia Art Museum is pleased to present “Live Cinema/Manon de Boer: Resonating Surfaces – A Trilogy”. The trilogy will be presented on a rotating weekly schedule. Resonating Surfaces – A Trilogy presents for the first time in a museum exhibition a series of three cinematic portraits defined by narratives of time and memory, and structured around the relation between images and sounds. Created over a period of ten years by the contemporary Dutch artist and filmmaker Manon de Boer, the films feature personal introspective narratives focused on the transformative experiences of life in the seventies, a time when each of the protagonists struggled to define their identities.

» Read more «

Bookmark and Share

Manon de Boer trilogy screening at Artists Space – New York City

April 30th, 2012 by

Manon de Boer, Resonating Surfaces (still), 2005, courtesy Artists Space and the artist

Friday, May 4, 2012, 7-10pm

Artists Space presents Film Trilogy: Manon de Boer, with screenings of Sylvia Kristel – Paris (2003), Resonating Surfaces (2005), Think About Wood, Think About Metal (2010).

Manon de Boer’s trilogy of films center on the 1970s, and three women’s experiences of cultural, political and social radicalism during this period. They are both intimate portraits, and ruminations on the nature of memory in relation to personal biography. Through the reframing of interviews with Dutch actress Sylvia Kristel; Brazilian psychoanalyst Suely Rolnik; and American avant-garde percussionist Robyn Schulkowsky, de Boer develops a particular asynchronicity between image and sound, in which subtle layers of editing hold their own meaning. The voice itself takes on a particular role as the coming together of language and body, relating back to relayed narratives that trace an apex between political and sensory experience. The soundscapes of each work – the ambient buzz of a city, sequences from Alban Berg’s opera Lulu, and the percussive experiments of Robyn Schulkowsky – are both disjunctive, and redolent of a geographic and mnemonic sense of place.

This event will be introduced by curator and writer Fionn Meade.

Artists Space: Books & Talks
55 Walker Street
New York, NY 10013
Tel.: 212-226-3970

Bookmark and Share

Manon de Boer in group exhibition Time Again at Sculpture Center – New York City

May 9th, 2011 by

Manon de Boer, Attica, 2008, courtesy Sculpture Center and the artist

May 9 – July 25, 2011

SculptureCenter is pleased to present Time Again, an exhibition that explores the language of repetition, bringing together works that destabilize conventional ways of seeing and considering what is past and what is present. Engaging gesture, image sequence, material affect, and displaced narrative, the works on view create disjunctions with the way the time of the present is experienced, challenging our understanding of what it means to be contemporaries. For a full exhibition description please view the Press Release. The Curator’s essay is available to download here.
» Read more «

Bookmark and Share

Manon de Boer solo exhibition at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis – St. Louis, MO

January 21st, 2011 by

Manon de Boer, still from Attica, 2008, courtesy CAM St. Louis and the artist

January 21 – May 1, 2011

For her first major exhibition in the United States, the acclaimed Dutch, Brussels-based artist Manon de Boer asks us to listen as we look in uniquely crafted films that are defined by sound.

Manon de Boer, still from Dissonant, 2010, courtesy CAM St. Louis and the artist

For over a decade, she has made a series of cinematic portraits, depicting friends, writers, dancers, composers, and musicians to explore questions of time and memory. Meanwhile, she examines how musical structures can transform what we experience. With a focus on performance and the ways that sound can give a film its form CAM spotlights De Boer’s expansive and grounding experimentations with sound, image, and the fundamental experiences of film. For Presto, Perfect Sound (2006), De Boer shot six takes of a violin performance, out of which she cut and then reconstructed the optimal sound composites to produce a "perfect performance," despite the visual glitches we see before us. In Two Times 4’33" (2008), her camera fixes on the feeling of silence, on film and in the body, as it reverberates through the audience and extends to us off screen. A third film, Dissonant (2010), reveals the rupture between what we see and hear, and as the screen goes black, the viewer trades vision for the pure aural experience of a dancer’s moving feet.

Manon de Boer, still from Two Times 4’33″, 2008, courtesy CAM St. Louis and the artist

In an ambitious installation conceived especially for CAM’s galleries, De Boer presents four key works that address her attention to the structures of music, orchestrating her films so that each portrait amplifies the connection between image and sound, performer and audience asking us to revisit the process of looking and listening through the artist’s singular interrogation of cinema.

Manon de Boer, still from Perfect Sound, 2006, courtesy CAM St. Louis and the artist

Manon de Boer: Between Perception and Sensation is curated by Laura Fried, Associate Curator, and João Ribas, Curator at the MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge. The exhibition is organized by CAM.

Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis
3750 Washington Blvd

St. Louis, MO 63108

Tel.: 314-535-4660

www.camstl.org

Bookmark and Share

Manon de Boer screening of "Dissonant" at 48th New York Film Festival – New York City

October 2nd, 2010 by


Manon de Boer, still from Dissonant, 2010, 11m., 16mm transferred to DV, color, sound, courtesy New York Film Festival

October 2, 2010, 12noon

Screening of “Dissonant” by Manon de Boer (Netherlands/Belgium), as part of the New York Film Festival’s “Mirror of Shadow and Cinders” program.

Manon de Boer films dancer Cynthia Loemij while the latter dances for about 10 minutes to Eugène Ysaÿe’s three sonates for violin solo a piece that holds vivid memories for her. The camera follows her every movement.

A physical time limit, namely the three-minute duration of one 16mm film roll, interrupts the camera’s continued movement. While the dance continues, and the sound of it is audible, the screen is black during the one minute that is needed to change the film roll.

During the moments that the image is in suspense, a trick is being played on the audience’s memory. Just as Loemij herself has to draw the music from her memory, the viewer can project the image of Loemij’s dancing body on the black screen when there is no image, because of the sound and the repetitive movement of her dancing. By giving the dance and film recording the time that they need, the audience is faced with confused dissonance.

The 48th New York Film Festival
Film Society of Lincoln Center

Walter Reade Film Theater

165 West 65th Street

New York, NY

www.filmlinc.com/nyff/2010/

Bookmark and Share