Iwan Baan solo exhibition at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, with work to benefit Sandy relief efforts – Los Angeles, CA

February 9th, 2013 by
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Iwan Baan, The City and the Storm, 2012, Digital C-Print, 70 3/4 x 47 1/4 inches (179.7 x 120 cm), courtesy of the photographer and Perry Rubenstein Gallery

February 20 – April 13, 2013
Opening reception: Wednesday, February 20, 2013, 6-8pm

On December 17, 2012 Perry Rubenstein Gallery announced its representation of Iwan Baan in his artistic practice. Baan’s work exists at a critical juncture between architectural photography and sociocultural inquiry at a time when urbanization is a driving force behind human evolution. His iconic image of New York City after super storm Sandy will be sold in an edition of 10 to benefit the Mayor’s Fund to Advance New York City in support of Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. His first solo exhibition at the gallery will take place from February 20 until April 13, 2013.

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Various Dutch works in exhibition “Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000″ at MoMA – New York City

June 23rd, 2012 by

July 29 – November 5, 2012

MoMA’s ambitious survey of 20th century design for children is the first large-scale overview of the modernist preoccupation with children and childhood as a paradigm for progressive design thinking. The exhibition will bring together areas underrepresented in design history and often considered separately, including school architecture, clothing, playgrounds, toys and games, children’s hospitals and safety equipment, nurseries, furniture, and books. It includes work by among others Aldo van Eyck, Piet Zwart, Ko Verzuu / ado company, Europlastic (Cu-Briks toys), Theo van Doesburg, Gerrit Rietveld, Cor Alons, Paul Schuitema, Wim Brusse, Emmy Andriesse, Karel Appel + Constant, Rineke Dijkstra, Twan Verdonck, Studio Boot, Vilmos Huszar, npk industrial design, Wild Plakken.

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Experimental Jetset in Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language show at MoMA – New York City

May 6th, 2012 by

Experimental Jetset. Zang Tum Tum. If You Want It. 2003, courtesy the designers

May 6 – August 27, 2012

MoMA presents Ecstatic Alphabets/Heaps of Language, a group exhibition that brings together 12 contemporary artists and artists’ groups working in all mediums including painting, sculpture, film, video, audio, and design, all of whom concentrate on the material qualities of language—visual, aural, and beyond, including the work by Experimental Jetset. The work that these artists create belongs to a distinguished history of poem/objects, and concrete language experiments that dates to the beginnings of modernism, and includes both the Dada and Futurist moments as well as the recrudescence of Neo-Dada in the late 1950s, and international literary movements like concrete and sound poetry in Europe, Latin America, and the United States. Like visual artists who experimented with abstract forms with the goal of arriving at a non-metaphoric artwork that was itself and nothing else, artists working with words in the late 1950s and 1960s used language as a medium; letters, words, and texts were dissected, displayed as objects, or arranged so that form and content were combined.

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Viviane Sassen in New Photography 2011 exhibition at MoMA – New York City

September 24th, 2011 by

Viviane Sassen, Parasomnia, 2010, courtesy MoMA and the artist

September 28, 2011 – January 16, 2012

The Museum of Modern Art announces the 26th annual New Photography exhibition, this year expanding to feature six artists—Zhang Dali, Moyra Davey, George Georgiou, Deana Lawson, Doug Rickard, and Viviane Sassen. These artists, hailing from Canada, China, England, Holland, and the United States, exemplify the diversity and international scope of contemporary photographic work. New Photography 2011 is organized by Dan Leers, The Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow, Department of Photography, The Museum of Modern Art.

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Simon Heijdens in group exhibition Talk to Me at MoMA – New York City

July 20th, 2011 by

Simon Heijdens, Broken White, 2004, courtesy the designer

July 19 – November 7, 2011

MoMA presents Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Objects, a survey exhibition that includes the work of Simon Heijdens. Talk to Me explores the communication between people and things. All objects contain information that goes well beyond their immediate use or appearance. In some cases, objects like cell phones and computers exist to provide us with access to complex systems and networks, behaving as gateways and interpreters. Whether openly and actively, or in subtle, subliminal ways, things talk to us, and designers help us develop and improvise the dialogue.
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Presentation of 2010 World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize to architects Bierman Henket and Wessel de Jonge at MoMA – New York City

November 18th, 2010 by

Zonnestraal Sanatorium after restoration, courtesy World Monuments Fund, Jannes Linders fotograaf Rotterdam NL

Thursday, November 18, 2010, 6pm
RSVP required. Click here. Seating is limited.

Presentation of the 2010 World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize.

Bonnie Burnham, President, World Monuments Fund and Barry Bergdoll, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art and 2010 WMF/Knoll Modernism Prize Jury Chairman, invite you to the presentation of the 2010 World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize to Bierman Henket, architecten, and Wessel de Jonge, architecten, for the restoration of Zonnestraal Sanatorium, Hilversum, the Netherlands. Lecture by the recipients and reception to follow.

Zonnestraal was conceived by Johannes Duiker (1890-1935), the leading spokesperson for the modern movement in the Netherlands; Bernard Bijvoet (1889-1979); and structural engineer Jan Gerko Wiebenga (1880-1974). Founded by the Diamond Workers Union of Amsterdam, the sanatorium was part of a larger aftercare colony for tubercular patients. It was funded by Union dues as a facility that would train members who had been afflicted with the disease for their return to society. Zonnestraal is emblematic of the emerging ideals of social democracy in the Netherlands during the 1920s, and it reflected the new concept of using occupational therapy in health care.

Zonnestraal Sanatorium before restoration, courtesy World Monuments Fund, Jannes Linders fotograaf Rotterdam NL

The sanatorium, designed 1926-28 and completed in 1931, is located in the village of Hilversum, about 25 kilometers southeast of Amsterdam. Its significance and survival were of critical importance to the Dutch government, which convened the country’s highest levels of architectural talent beginning in 1982 to develop a plan to rescue the complex. The development of this plan by Hubert-Jan Henket and Wessel de Jonge, two of the leading practitioners in the restoration of modern landmarks, led to their creation of Docomomo and current global efforts to preserve modern architecture at risk. Learn more at www.wmf.org.

Zonnestraal Sanatorium after restoration, courtesy World Monuments Fund, Jannes Linders fotograaf Rotterdam NL

The World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize was established as part of the larger advocacy mission of the World Monuments Fund Modernism at Risk Initiative to acknowledge the specific and growing threats neglect, deterioration, and demolition facing significant Modern buildings, and to recognize the architects and designers who help ensure their rejuvenation and long-term survival through new design solutions.

Jury: Barry Bergdoll, Jury Chairman, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, Jean-Louis Cohen, Sheldon H. Solow Professor in the History of Architecture at New York University, Kenneth Frampton, Ware Professor of Architecture at Columbia University, Dietrich Neumann, Professor of the History of Art and Architecture at Brown University, Theo Prudon President of Docomomo US and Adjunct Associate Professor of Historic Preservation at Columbia University, Karen Stein, Design consultant, writer, and faculty member in the Design Criticism program at the School of Visual Arts, New York City

The World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize and the World Monuments Fund Modernism at Risk Initiative were established with founding support from Knoll, Inc. The 2010 World Monuments Fund/Knoll Modernism Prize Lecture and Reception are funded with support from the Netherland-America Foundation, in conjunction with 5 Dutch Days 5 Boroughs.

Museum of Modern Art, New York City
Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building

Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater)

4 West 54th Street

New York, NY 10019

www.wmf.org

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UN Studio in survey exhibition Building Collections: Recent Acquisitions of Architecture at MoMA – New York City

November 10th, 2010 by

Various models from the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart, Germany (2001-2006) acquired by MoMA, image courtesy UN Studio

November 10, 2010 – May 30, 2011

Presenting a selection of models and drawings acquired by the Department of Architecture and Design since 2005 the vast majority on view for the first time Building Collections underscores the rationale and motives of collecting architecture at MoMA. The exhibition is organized around several themes, including ornament and abstraction, modernist urbanism and utopias, Latin American modernism, the revival of Berlin architecture since reunification, and the role of process in architecture since the digital revolution. Featured works date from 1890 to the present, and represent such diverse figures as Louis Sullivan, Le Corbusier, Bodo and Heinz Rasch, Jean Tschumi, Ant Farm, Paulo Mendes da Rocha, Sauerbruch Hutton, Barkow Leibinger, UN Studio, and Seung H-Sang of Korea.

Organized by Barry Bergdoll, The Philip Johnson Chief Curator of Architecture and Design, and Margot Weller, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design.

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street

New York, NY 10019

Tel.: 212-708-9400

www.moma.org

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Adriaan Geuze lecture about Governors Island at MoMA – New York City

April 29th, 2010 by


April 29, 2010, 6-7:30pm

"The Promise of an Island: the Plan for Governors Island’s Park and Public Space."
A presentation by Adriaan Geuze.

Museum of Modern Art
Theater 3 (The Celeste Bartos Theater)
The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building

4 West 54th Street

New York, NY

www.moma.org

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Action! Design over Time at MoMA – New York City

February 4th, 2010 by



February 5, 2010 – Ongoing

The Museum of Modern Art presents “Action! Design over Time,” an international exhibition with work by various Dutch designers such as Joris Laarman and Christien Meindertsma.

Objects are not still. And yet design is often considered in terms of static aesthetic and functional qualities, without much consideration of trajectory in time or relationships with people. The objects presented in Action! Design over Time reveal the often overlooked dimension of temporality, providing a deeper understanding of contemporary design. Some of these objects embody frozen moments in time, whether crafted by hand (like Ingo Maurer’s Porca Miseria! chandelier, which is made of broken dishes) or crystallized by a computer using a digital manufacturing machine (as with Ammar Eloueini’s CoReFab chair). Instead of a single moment, other featured objects capture entire lifecycles; Christien Meindertsma’s book PIG 05049 tracks all 185 products made from a single pig. Some examples focus on communication and interaction design, whose nature is inherently connected to time. These interfaces and visualizations interpret and render data over time commercial air traffic across the United States, taxi traffic in San Francisco, or the editorial evolution of Wikipedia entries, for instance in an elegant and efficient way.

The exhibition is organized by Paola Antonelli, Senior Curator, Patricia Juncosa-Vecchierini and Kate Carmody, Curatorial Assistants, Department of Architecture and Design.

MoMA
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel.: 212-708-9400

www.moma.org

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Aernout Mik solo exhibition at Museum of Modern Art – New York City

May 6th, 2009 by

Aernout Mik, Scapegoats (2006), courtesy the artist

May 6 – July 27, 2009

The Museum of Modern Art presents the exhibition Aernout Mik, the first North American survey of the artist’s work. Mik (Dutch, b. 1962) is distinguished for his ability to combine, shift, and transform artistic practices by creating installations that integrate moving images, sculpture, and architecture into single constructions. Eight of the artist’s works are installed in gallery and non-gallery spaces throughout the Museum, ranging from Mik’s first filmed work Fluff (1996) to Schoolyard (2009), which was commissioned by the Museum for the exhibition. Aernout Mik is organized by Laurence Kardish, Senior Curator, with Kelly Sidley, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art.

Silent, looped films are the focus of each installation, which often include a structure specifically built to display Mik’s moving images. In these films the artist implies current societal issues, from economic crises and immigration struggles to parliamentary clashes and outright warfare. Although Mik’s films appear to document actual events, the scenes are often fully staged by the artist, challenging viewers’ systems of belief and interrogating basic cinematic concepts of narrative and realism. As incidents unfold in silence, very little becomes clear. No characters are introduced, no plots develop, and no boundaries are defined, making it difficult to interpret the content and context of each circumstance.

Mr. Kardish states: "Aernout Mik is an artist who exemplifies the fluidity of boundaries. With his moving-image installations, Mik creates a kinesthetic relationship between the installation and viewer, who immediately absorbs the geography of the piece, the curious nature of the structure itself, and the compelling images that occupy the volume Mik has created."

Aernout Mik, Middlemen (2001), courtesy the artist

The single-screen floor piece Middlemen (2001) confronts visitors as they enter the main lobby of the Museum from 53rd Street. Approximately 36 feet in length and seven feet tall, the construction inevitably choreographs viewers, both in determining where they stand and how they engage both with other observers of the work and the moving images themselves. In the film component of Middlemen, Mik portrays a stock market floor or commodities exchange peopled with workers who appear to be nervously awaiting something unknown. Capturing the internal anxieties of these "middlemen," the camera’s movements long pans mixed with close-up details that jump to wider views of the room mimic the motions of the bodies and emphasize the jittery atmosphere felt within the space.

Aernout Mik, Osmosis and Excess (2005), courtesy the artist

At the other end of the lobby, the single-channel video installation Osmosis and Excess (2005) hangs near the Museum’s main information desk. The work opposes detailed views of two very different settings: a mega-pharmacy in Tijuana, Mexico, and a car-strewn landscape just outside that city. Although these two scenes appear to be opposites, similar imagery connects them, emphasizing the tangled relationship between consumers and their waste.

The installation Vacuum Room (2005) is on view in the Special Exhibitions Gallery on the second floor. Vacuum Room is a freestanding architectural structure featuring a six-channel film projected onto screens inserted into the walls, creating an interior space scattered with floor pillows and chairs for viewers to sit upon. The work documents an ambiguous conflict among a band of rebels within a legislative or judicial chamber but as with most of Mik’s works, the exact setting of the film is left unclear. While each channel features moving images from a different stationary camera set within the legislative chamber, the images do not follow a linear sequence. Training Ground (2006), also on display within the same gallery, is a freestanding architectural structure holding a two-channel projection. The film portrays uniformed guards performing field exercises; yet the actions of the film eventually and slowly reverse, with those in power and those submitting to power becoming blurred.

Aernout Mik, Schoolyard (2009), courtesy the artist

The newly commissioned Schoolyard (2009), on view outside the Special Exhibitions Gallery, is a two-channel video installation set at a vocational high school in The Netherlands. After the school has been evacuated for an unspecified reason, groups begin to form outside, including students of various ethnic backgrounds, including Dutch, Turkish, Surinamese, and Moroccan. In turn, various processions arise, with participants either celebrating ecstatically or mourning together, erupting in brief flashes and then just as quickly subsiding. Also on the second floor, the single-channel video installation Scapegoats (2006) comprises a freestanding screen that sits directly on the ground. It is set in an unspecified sports arena, where military operations dominate the entire atmosphere, from combat trucks parked inside the structure to frequent displays of weaponry.

Raw Footage (2006) is on display in the Museum’s Roy and Niuta Titus 1 Theater Lobby Gallery. This two-channel film installation marks a turn for the artist. Instead of devising scenarios and shooting the imagery himself, Mik used materials from newsreels documenting the civil war in Yugoslavia. Mik often pairs related subjects side-by-side, ranging from soldiers loading and firing their guns to visual records of their off-duty hours as they nap and listen to music. This work retains the sound from the original news tapes, and is the only work with audio in the exhibition.

Mik’s 1996 single-channel video, Fluff, will be installed on the 6th and 4th floors. It will also be shown 24 hours a day on a monitor visible from the sidewalk near the 11 West 53rd Street film entrance. Shot in super 16mm, Fluff proceeds in a series of stationary shots. As a small cast meanders through what appears to be a warehouse filled with plastic-wrapped furniture and shipping pallets, wads of fluff inexplicably pelt their bodies.

Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel.: 212-708-9400

www.moma.org

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