Elsbeth Struijk van Bergen cover story for Surface Magazine

July 20th, 2012 by

Copyright © 2012 Surface Magazine / Elsbeth Struijk van Bergen. All Rights Reserved. Courtesy the artist.

Summer 2012

The Summer issue of Surface Magazine includes a cover feature by Dutch photographer Elsbeth Struijk van Bergen, an Amsterdam-based photographer whose portraiture tells a universal story, while focusing on the individuality of her subjects. Archetypal environments, expressive of the modern, industrial or domestic landscapes that frame everyday life, form the reductive backdrop for her chronicle of the human experience. The subjects are always the focus, more sharply present against the man-made backgrounds they inhabit. Austere and yet captivating the intimate nature of portraiture, her images are at once still and emotional.

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Interview with Charlotte Dumas about her “Retrieved” series and upcoming benefit sale on Sep 29 – New York City

September 26th, 2011 by

Tim Groen, portrait of Charlotte Dumas, courtesy Tim Groen, www.timgroen.com

Photographer Charlotte Dumas created a series of portraits of the remaining 9/11 search and rescue dogs, called Retrieved. The series was also turned into a book  which is now on its second print run, and for which waiting lists exist, worldwide. The rest, as they say, is history. The media ran with the story and Charlotte was taken by surprise by the overwhelmingly positive media attention. Now Charlotte feels, it is time to pay it forward. On Thursday 9/29, the photographer will be hosting a silent auction of five of her favorite images from Retrieved, with all profits going to The First Responder Alliance (details here). She will also be signing a limited number of copies of the book.

Orange Alert sat down and spoke with Charlotte to talk about all the activity and attention following the series.

OA: On August 10, The New York Times published a selection of the portraits from Retrieved. Can you tell us about what that publication set in motion?

CD: After the dogs ran—no pun intended—in The New York Times Magazine, responses came from everywhere, right away. Both from dog owners and handlers, from people who had been involved with the rescue operations at 9/11, and mostly from other reporters and editors who also wanted to feature the portraits of these dogs. Subsequently the series appeared in dailies all over the world, such as  The Sunday Times and The Daily Mail, La Repubblica, El Pais, Ta Nea, Greece, even The Herald Sun in Australia! At the same time TV newscasts focused their stories on the dogs that I had portrayed for this project. So it lead to several Radio and television interviews, like CNN, and an explosion of the subject in the blogosphere.

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Charlotte Dumas special sale to benefit The First Responder Alliance at Clic Gallery – New York City

September 21st, 2011 by

Thursday, September 29, 2011, 6-8pm

During a very special one-night-only silent auction, five of photographer Charlotte Dumas’ favorite photographs from the sixteen-part series Retrieved will be offered up to benefit the First Responder Alliance. All five prints will include Charlotte’s personal notes on the depicted rescue veterans, providing a more detailed and intimate impression of each dog’s career. The extras will include visuals which are not available elsewhere. Charlotte will be present at the event, where she will be signing her new book, Retrieved, throughout the evening. The first print-run of Retrieved is sold out ahead of the 10/31 release date, and is on its second run! For more information: www.retrievedbycharlottedumas.tumblr.com

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Portrait: Tim Groen

June 8th, 2011 by


Orange Alert (OA): Can you tell us a little bit about your background in Holland and your reasons for moving to New York City / The United States?

Tim Groen (TG): I’m the product of generations of Amsterdam: one of my grandmothers ran one of the first contemporary galleries in The Netherlands Galerie 845–and on the other side is a long line of Groen antiques dealers. My parents were total hippies, so a steady, corporate job wasn’t really ever in the stars for me. When I first started coming here I was drawn to it because it’s the center of publishing and work and all that stuff, but the simple truth is that I immediately felt at ease, amongst likeminded souls. I felt safe in New York and I still do.

OA: How did you find your bearings in New York City and what were the first steps you made professionally?

TG: Since my first trip to New York, at 11 years old, I wanted to live here. Many years later, after art school, when I was ready to go, the first thing I did was find myself a good New York agent. Pretty soon the gigs started coming in, and I was creating work for Sony, MTV, for all these magazines I loved, from Interview to the New York Times Magazine. Kind of wild! And that’s how I developed a "local" portfolio, which was much more important at the time, when we were still lugging actual portfolios around. And the commercial work gave me the opportunity to keep creating non-commissioned art. In retrospect that was important, because that’s how I got to the point where I am now, where I don’t think in terms of ‘Commercial’ versus ‘Art’ anymore. Whether it is writing or art directing or art, it all stems from the same creativity.

OA: What inspires you in this city, and do you feel that your Dutch roots are still an influence in your development as an artist?

TG: I was talking to David van der Leer of the Guggenheim, who said that we all connect with friends and colleagues from other international hubs like London or Beijing. It’s like we more or less traded in our national identities for a more international jacket. And I feel very comfortable wearing that jacket; I love having open-minded friends and clients whose perspectives are wide and global. That’s how I learn, it’s as simple as that. That said, I’m certainly influenced by fellow Dutchmen like Rietveld, Sandberg, Crouwel, or even Jan Dibbets. There’s probably something Dutch about my compositions and colors, like in my portraits of Krijn de Koning or Jan Taminiau, for example. But in the end that’s easier for others to recognize then it is for me; I look at way too much stuff to try and pin my influences down.

OA: Of all the clients you worked for, or out of the projects you did, which is the most New York-centric?

TG: The answer would have to be: doing several seasons of the Barneys New York print campaign, which ran in The New York Times. ‘New York’ appears in that sentence twice, hello! At the time there was nothing cooler than Barneys New York*it’s an institution, part of this city’s fashion fabric. But arguably, most of what I’m doing right now is pretty New York-specific, even if someone in Paris or London gets to see it. Fabrics for Tucker by Gaby Basora, graphics for Sigerson Morrison, paintings for Jonathan Adler, none of it would have come to me if I were anywhere else.

OA: Tell us a little bit about the “Portraits/People” project. How did it start and where do you plan to take it?

TG: I really wanted a project of my own incorporating my interests in art, photography and writing that would be current, personal and hopefully relevant to others. That’s how I came up with this idea of portraying these amazing people I know. Friends, friends of friends, people whose work I love, etcetera. So instead of making collages of found imagery, I started working with portraits I took of them myself, using my cheap little camera. All very low-tech and easy-breezy. Having written a lot for magazines, I wanted to throw a written element in there too, by way of interviews. Basically Portraits/People is just me being curious. The project is turning out to be the kind of thing I myself want to read and look at, which is always very satisfying. I still have a long list of incredible people who agreed to pose, and an even longer list of people I want to approach, but eventually it will be a book, because I love the printed page.

OA: What other projects or assignments are you currently working on that inspire you?

TG: Right now I’m getting ready for my second solo exhibition at Ivy Brown Gallery in the Meatpacking District which is fun, and a little nerve-wrecking at the same time, in an exciting way!

For more information on Tim Groen and his work, please visit his website: www.timgroen.com

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NEW: Jacqueline Hassink portrait and interview by Tim Groen – New York City

April 26th, 2011 by

Jacqueline Hassink, Artist, portrait by Tim Groen, 2011, courtesy Tim Groen

Multi-talented artist, writer and art director Tim Groen added a portrait of Dutch photographer/artist Jacqueline Hassink to his ongoing Portraits/People series. Below is an excerpt of his introduction. For the full interview, please visit Tim Groen’s website.

“Photographer/artist Jacqueline Hassink wouldn’t mind taking a break, but in the near future that’s just not in the stars for her. "I’m making a movie in the Buddhist temples of Kyoto, working on a book about Japanese gardens for German publisher Hatje Cantz, and researching a project on the new economy in China." The New York-based but always traveling artist has assistants in New York, as well as in Amsterdam and Tokyo, and she keeps them busy according to the flow of projects. "Whatever I can delegate, I push away." Right now she’s compiling a book on her haute couture Fitting Rooms series, for which she was allowed to photograph the fitting rooms (discreetly sans customers) of some of the world’s most exclusive couturiers. And she is creating a hi-tech sequel to what is probably one of her most well-known projects; The Table of Power, on which she first worked from 1993 to 1995. Hassink’s work Considering her preference for corporate and formal subject matters, I wasn’t expecting for us to be laughing as much as we did.” –by Tim Groen

To read the full interview with Jacqueline Hassink by Tim Groen, click here.

www.timgroen.com

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Tim Groen solo exhibition at Ivy Brown Gallery – New York City

March 3rd, 2011 by

Tim Groen, A new self: The Artist’s World by Daniel Fresnay, PT 2, 2009, Mixed media on paper, courtesy the artist

March 3 – April 22, 2011
Opening reception: March 3, 2011, 6-9pm

Ivy Brown Gallery is pleased to announce Tim Groen‘s second solo exhibition with the gallery.

Captions is comprised of the text based collages on paper Tim Groen has been creating since 2008, based on actual captions that clarify book-illustrations. Hand cutting each letter, using a font based on a 19th century wood type, he mounts the descriptive texts on identically sized boards (16" X 20). The paper used for the type and the grounds is usually painted by Tim Groen, in a mostly somber palette. The newest Captions tends to consist of black type on an untreated background of white or cream board.

Tim Groen, Marie Antoinette: Enchanted Visions, Claude Arthaud, PT 3, 2009, Mixed media on paper, courtesy the artist

"By taking all these texts, I’m creating this seemingly random assortment," he explains, "But in the end, since each one is picked by me, it says something about where my head is at, what kind of books I’m looking at, what sticks out to me*"

The appeal to Tim is that Captions almost reads like a personal diary, yet there is something universal about these short, isolated texts. Picking captions that run the gamut from the idyllic to the disastrous ("Unfolding leaf buds of a Fatsia Japonica," versus "7 Auschwitz 1957,") he also finds himself using captions that leave little doubt as to their book-specific origins: "Facing Page: Detail of Fig. 50."

Tim Groen, Facing Page: Bloomsbury Rooms by Christopher Reed, 2008, Mixed media on paper, courtesy the artist

"Referring to the fact that these are all pulled from books is important to me," he says, "The concept starts with my love for books, the printed word, and looking at images on paper." The Captions in the exhibition represent a selection from the series; Tim is continuously creating new additions.

Tim Groen, Hemingway: Sigmar Polke, History of Everything, PT, 2009, Mixed media on paper, courtesy the artist

While he has made a stylistic choice of only using lower case type, the captions themselves, including all punctuation and abbreviations, are lifted verbatim. Each piece is titled after the book it was pulled from, and frequently includes the author’s name. For example, the collage that says "A Thank-You Note From The First Lady," is titled "Stork Club, Blumenthal."

Tim Groen, Man Marble: Arp sculptures By Michel Seuphor, 2010, Mixed media on paper, courtesy the artist

Tim Groen is an Amsterdam-born art director/artist currently based in New York. He studied at the Hogeschool voor de Kunsten in Utrecht and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. He has been commissioned by a variety of media and fashion companies including MTV, Levi’s, Maybelline and The New York Times Magazine.

Tim Groen, Psilocybin Mushroom: The Golden Age of Advertising, The 70′s, 2010, Mixed media on paper, courtesy the artist

Ivy brown Gallery
675 Hudson Street, 4th Floor

New York, NY 10014

www.ivybrowngallery.org

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NEW FEATURE: PROFILES – Tim Groen – New York City

January 6th, 2011 by

Tim Groen, image courtesy the artist

January 7, 2011

Orange Alert Dutch Art Events introduces a new series of profiles on Dutch talent living and working in the United States. Our first profile focuses on Tim Groen, a multi-talented art director, designer, artist, illustrator, and writer who has been living and working in NewYork since the late nineties. He studied at the Hogeschool voor de Kunsten in Utrecht and the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in his hometown of Amsterdam before making the move to New York, where he has worked for a wide variety of clients such as Barneys New York, Flaunt, Interview, MTV Networks, The New York Times Magazine, Conran, Sigerson Morrison, Sony Music, and many more.

Tim Groen, Brad Fisher, Model/Artist, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Brad Fisher

One of the many different projects that he is working on entails an autonomous project called “Portraits/People”. In this project he portrays friends and colleagues who he admires through photographic portraits, collages and interviews. So far Tim’s subjects include models (Will Lewis, Brad Fisher), artists (Adam Cvijanovic, Scooter LaForge), fashion designers (Gaby Basora, Selima Salaun, John Bartlett), and editors and writers (Felix Burrichter, Aric Chen). A fair amount of Dutch artists and creatives makes it into Portraits/People as well; from expats like Koos van den Akker and David van der Leer, to artists who are mostly based in the Netherlands but who have New York gallery-representation, like Charlotte Dumas and Krijn de Koning.

Tim Groen, Adam Cvijanovic, Artist, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Adam Cvijanovic

Orange Alert (OA): Can you tell us a little bit about your background in Holland and your reasons for moving to New York City / The United States?

Tim Groen (TG): I’m the product of generations of Amsterdam: one of my grandmothers ran one of the first contemporary galleries in The Netherlands Galerie 845–and on the other side is a long line of Groen antiques dealers. My parents were total hippies, so a steady, corporate job wasn’t really ever in the stars for me. When I first started coming here I was drawn to it because it’s the center of publishing and work and all that stuff, but the simple truth is that I immediately felt at ease, amongst likeminded souls. I felt safe in New York and I still do.

Tim Groen, Koos van den Akker, Designer, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Koos van den Akker

OA: How did you find your bearings in New York City and what were the first steps you made professionally?

TG: Since my first trip to New York, at 11 years old, I wanted to live here. Many years later, after art school, when I was ready to go, the first thing I did was find myself a good New York agent. Pretty soon the gigs started coming in, and I was creating work for Sony, MTV, for all these magazines I loved, from Interview to the New York Times Magazine. Kind of wild! And that’s how I developed a "local" portfolio, which was much more important at the time, when we were still lugging actual portfolios around. And the commercial work gave me the opportunity to keep creating non-commissioned art. In retrospect that was important, because that’s how I got to the point where I am now, where I don’t think in terms of ‘Commercial’ versus ‘Art’ anymore. Whether it is writing or art directing or art, it all stems from the same creativity.

Tim Groen, Ellis Faas, Make-up Artist/Founder Ellis Faas Cosmetics, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Ellis Faas

OA: What inspires you in this city, and do you feel that your Dutch roots are still an influence in your development as an artist?

TG: I was talking to David van der Leer of the Guggenheim, who said that we all connect with friends and colleagues from other international hubs like London or Beijing. It’s like we more or less traded in our national identities for a more international jacket. And I feel very comfortable wearing that jacket; I love having open-minded friends and clients whose perspectives are wide and global. That’s how I learn, it’s as simple as that. That said, I’m certainly influenced by fellow Dutchmen like Rietveld, Sandberg, Crouwel, or even Jan Dibbets. There’s probably something Dutch about my compositions and colors, like in my portraits of Krijn de Koning or Jan Taminiau, for example. But in the end that’s easier for others to recognize then it is for me; I look at way too much stuff to try and pin my influences down.

Tim Groen, Whitney Pozgay, Founder/Designer WHIT, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Whitney Pozgay

OA: Of all the clients you worked for, or out of the projects you did, which is the most New York-centric?

TG: The answer would have to be: doing several seasons of the Barneys New York print campaign, which ran in The New York Times. ‘New York’ appears in that sentence twice, hello! At the time there was nothing cooler than Barneys New York*it’s an institution, part of this city’s fashion fabric. But arguably, most of what I’m doing right now is pretty New York-specific, even if someone in Paris or London gets to see it. Fabrics for Tucker by Gaby Basora, graphics for Sigerson Morrison, paintings for Jonathan Adler, none of it would have come to me if I were anywhere else.

Tim Groen, Jan Taminiau, Designer, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Jan Taminiau

OA: Tell us a little bit about the “Portraits/People” project. How did it start and where do you plan to take it?

TG: I really wanted a project of my own incorporating my interests in art, photography and writing that would be current, personal and hopefully relevant to others. That’s how I came up with this idea of portraying these amazing people I know. Friends, friends of friends, people whose work I love, etcetera. So instead of making collages of found imagery, I started working with portraits I took of them myself, using my cheap little camera. All very low-tech and easy-breezy. Having written a lot for magazines, I wanted to throw a written element in there too, by way of interviews. Basically Portraits/People is just me being curious. The project is turning out to be the kind of thing I myself want to read and look at, which is always very satisfying. I still have a long list of incredible people who agreed to pose, and an even longer list of people I want to approach, but eventually it will be a book, because I love the printed page.

Tim Groen, Charlotte Dumas, Artist, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Charlotte Dumas

OA: What other projects or assignments are you currently working on that inspire you?

TG: Right now I’m getting ready for my second solo exhibition at Ivy Brown Gallery in the Meatpacking District which is fun, and a little nerve-wrecking at the same time, in an exciting way!

Tim Groen, Gerald DeCock, Artist/Hair Stylist, courtesy the artist, click here for Tim’s portrait of Gerald DeCock

For more information on Tim Groen and his work, please visit his website.

www.timgroen.com

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Tim Groen collages reception during Fashion’s Night Out at Sigerson Morrison Laboratory Boutique – New York City

September 10th, 2010 by


September 10, 2010 6:30-9pm
Exhibition: September 1-11, 2010

Join artist Tim Groen for cocktails during Fashion’s Night Out to celebrate his collages at the Sigerson Morrison Laboratory Boutique.

Sigerson Morrison Laboratory Boutique
19 East 71st Street (@ Madison)
New York, NY 10021

Tel.: 212-734-2100

www.sigersonmorrison.com

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